Adam Wren

A Midwest-based journalist, writer and editor.

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How Evernote Can Help Reporters and Writers Streamline Their Research

in Evernote / No Comments

When it comes to organization, we writers and reporters are a sorry lot. Organized writers are all alike; every disorganized writer is disorganized in his own wayClick To TweetPowered By CoSchedule (to borrow what Leo Tolstoy once wrote about unhappy families).
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Why I Don’t Want to Be A Thought Leader

in Takeaways / No Comments

Because I believe there are problems in the world that are so nuanced they can’t be solved with acronyms.
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A Simple Trick To Get Your Writing Unstuck

in Writing / No Comments

We all get stuck. In writing and life, it’s easy to get hung up on a decision— finding the right word, the right job, the right opportunity.
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The Problem With Shipping

in Work / No Comments

Ship, they say. Publish or perish. Get it done. Get it out the door. Get it into the gaping maws of your hungry audience. Because shipping is what real artists do, as Steve Jobs said. Right? We’ve come to accept this conventional wisdom as the Gospel of Shipping: Better to practice your craft in public than private, the line of thinking goes.
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How to Make It In A Gig Economy

in Writing / No Comments

Mark Twain once said, “Write without pay until somebody offers to pay you. If nobody offers within three years, sawing wood is what you were intended for.”
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The Best Blog on Writing That You’ve Probably Never Read Before

in Writing / 3 Comments

You write. And you probably read a lot of blogs about writing. You read Nieman Story Board’s “Why’s This So Good?” and Acuff and Godin and Goins and Hyatt and Traub and probably even Brain Pickings, too, when you need some writerly inspiration. But there’s a blog that I’m going to share with you that’s simply one of the best. And you’re probably not reading it. In fact, I’m a little nervous about sharing this with you, for fear that it’ll give you a leg up on me (I jest, of course). It’s not published by some upstart in the publishing world, some web wunderkind. It’s published by The New York Times. The Times. But according to Feedly, only about 947 people read it on a regular basis—many of them Times writers, I imagine (something like 3k read Goins’ excellent blog on Feedly, for comparison’s sake). It’s After Deadline, and it’s written by Philip E.
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Show Your Scenius: 9 People I’m Learning From Right Now

in Work / No Comments

Creativity, and the work of making things, doesn’t happen in isolation. In his excellent book, Show Your Work!, Austin-based writer Austin Kleon writes about the importance of learning from a community of like-minded creatives. In doing so, Kleon argues, you can create a “scenius”—a group of people who constitute the avant-garde of your craft. “Under this model, great ideas are often birthed by a group of creative individuals — artists, curators, thinkers, theorists, and other tastemakers — who make up an ‘ecology of talent,’” Kleon writes.
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Why You Might Not Want to Call Your Craft ‘Art’ (Yet)

in Takeaways / 1 Comment

Is the product of your craft really art? For a certain class of the creative cognoscenti, it’s become de rigueur to call your craft “art.” We write a blog or e-book, ship it, and call it our “art.” But are we patting ourselves on the back when no pat is deserved?
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A Prayer For the City

in Books / No Comments

A rich, engaging and heartbreaking portrayal of a city trying to get back on its feet. It’s my book No. 11 for #Read26Indy, and the best non-fiction book I’ve read this year. Published via Pressgram
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Welcome to My New Online Outpost

in Takeaways / 1 Comment

Welcome to my new online outpost. Here, you can find my latest thinking on creativity, the craft of writing and storytelling. It’s my best effort to put forward a unified, comprehensive online presence—a task I’ve struggled for years to negotiate. As I studied the work of people such as John Saddington and others, I continued to refine the idea of what I wanted to see in pixels. I knew I wanted a landing page. But I also wanted a way to share my recent work and blog, too.
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